ACL Repair (Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair)


Anatomy of a normal knee

Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA), Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) and Extracapsular Repair at Family VetCare

The most common knee injury for dogs is a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CCL), referred to as the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in humans. Although dogs of all ages and sizes can rupture the CCL, our most common patients are middle-aged to older and are often obese. When a dog ruptures the CCL, the knee joint becomes unstable and painful, which leads to limping. If your dog is suffering from a CCL rupture, it is important to receive treatment as early as possible. Delaying treatment can lead to further joint damage including meniscal tears, worsening arthritis/pain, and a similar injury in the other leg caused by overuse.

Cranial cruciate ligament ruptures are typically repaired one of three ways: Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA), Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) and Extracapsular Repair with Lateral Fabellar Suture. These procedures offer different solutions for the same underlying problem, and there are pros and cons to each surgery. Often times, the best procedure for any given dog is dependent on the patient’s size, activity levels, and bone structure. Please see the Most Commonly Asked Questions for more information.

Dr. Travis Wodiske is experienced and well-versed in the treatment of CCL injuries, and can provide all the details to help you decide which procedure will serve your dog and family the very best. If your dog has a CCL rupture, and you are interested in learning more about Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA), Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) or Extracapsular Repair, please schedule an Orthopedic Exam and Consultation with Dr. Wodiske by clicking here.

**Please type “Request Dr. Wodiske” in the ‘Additional Notes’ section. Dr. Wodiske welcomes appointments at Family VetCare of Chandler and Family VetCare of Mesa.